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Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services The oldest federal agency for children, the Children's Bureau (CB) is located within the United States Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families. Listings of programs, reports, announcements, and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ).logo
 
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Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and the Brookings Institution The mission of the Future of Children is to translate the best social science research about children and youth into information that is useful to policymakers, practitioners, grant-makers, advocates, the media, and students of public policy.  The project publishes two journals and policy briefs each year, and provides various short summaries of our work. Topics range widely – from income policy to family issues to education and health – with children’s policy as the unifying element. The senior editorial team is diverse, representing two institutions and multiple disciplines.
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Stand For Children
Stand for Children Stand For Children is a national organization that encourages individuals to improve children's lives. Their mission is to identify, train, and connect local children's activists engaging in advocacy, awareness-raising, and service initiatives on an ongoing basis as part of Stand For Children Chapters also known as Children's Action Teams (CATs).
 
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Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services  The mission of the Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) is to promote safety, stability, and well-being for people who have experienced or been exposed to violence, neglect or trauma.  FYSB achieves this through supporting programs that provide shelter, community services and prevention education for youth, adults and families.
 
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Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services  A child is thinking about running away from home The National Runaway Safeline is there to help. The Safeline is a toll free, confidential hotline. The Safeline staff will listen and help kids think about what they need and want to do next. 1–800–RUNAWAY (1–800–786–2929)
 
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The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children  
 
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Interagency Working Group on Youth Programs (IWGYP), composed of representatives from 18 federal agencies that support programs and services focusing on youth.    FindYouthInfo.gov is the U.S. government Web site that helps you create, maintain, and strengthen effective youth programs. Included are youth facts, funding information, and tools to help you assess community assets, generate maps of local and federal resources, search for evidence-based youth programs, and keep up-to-date on the latest, youth-related news.
 
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logoHead Start Resource List

 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services  Resource listings
 
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click here to visit Child Welfare Information Gateway

 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services   Child Welfare Information Gateway promotes the safety, permanency, and well-being of children, youth, and families by connecting child welfare, adoption, and related professionals as well as the general public to information, resources, and tools covering topics on child welfare, child abuse and neglect, out-of-home care, adoption, and more.
 
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United States Department of Justice

Juveniles in crisis—from serious, violent, and chronic offenders to victims of abuse and neglect—pose a challenge to the nation. Charged by Congress to meet this challenge, OJJDP collaborates with professionals from diverse disciplines to improve juvenile justice policies and practices.

OJJDP, a component of the Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, accomplishes its mission by supporting states, local communities, and tribal jurisdictions in their efforts to develop and implement effective programs for juveniles. The Office strives to strengthen the juvenile justice system's efforts to protect public safety, hold offenders accountable, and provide services that address the needs of youth and their families.

Through its components, OJJDP sponsors research, program, and training initiatives; develops priorities and goals and sets policies to guide federal juvenile justice issues; disseminates information about juvenile justice issues; and awards funds to states to support local programming.

 

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